Here’s how against the Republican Establishment Trump is:

Eric Zuesse

The following is a reprint (excluding the footnotes) of the wikipedia article:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Republicans_opposing_Donald_Trump_presidential_campaign,_2016

List of Republicans opposing Donald Trump presidential campaign, 2016

Public officials[edit]

Former Presidents[edit]

Former President George H. W. Bush

George H. W. Bush, President of the United States (1989–93); Vice President of the United States (1981–89) (sources say he will vote for Hillary Clinton)[1][2]

Former 2016 Republican presidential primary candidates[edit]

All candidates signed a pledge to eventually support the party nominee. The following have refused to honor it.

Jeb Bush, Governor of Florida (1999–2007)[3]

Carly Fiorina, CEO of Hewlett-Packard (1999–2005); 2010 nominee for U.S. Senator from California (withdrew endorsement, called on Trump to withdraw his candidacy)[4][5]

Lindsey Graham, United States Senator from South Carolina (2003–present)[6]

John Kasich, Governor of Ohio (2011–present); U.S. Representative from Ohio (1983–2001)[7] (wrote in John McCain) [8]

George Pataki, Governor of New York (1995–2006)[9]

Former federal cabinet-level officials[edit]

Former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice

William Bennett, Director of the Office of National Drug Control Policy (1989–90); United States Secretary of Education (1985–99) (withdrew endorsement)[10]

Bill Brock, United States Secretary of Labor (1985-87); United States Trade Representative (1981-85); U.S. Senator from Tennessee (1971-77); Chairman of the Republican National Committee (1977-81)[11]

Michael Chertoff, United States Secretary of Homeland Security (2005–09); Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit (2003–05) (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[12][13]

Bill Cohen, United States Secretary of Defense (1997–2001); United States Senator from Maine (1979–97) (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[14][15]

Robert Gates, United States Secretary of Defense (2006–11); Director of Central Intelligence (1991–93)[16]

Carlos Gutierrez, United States Secretary of Commerce (2005–09) (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[17]

Carla Anderson Hills, United States Secretary of Housing and Urban Development (1975–77), United States Trade Representative (1989–93) (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[12][17]

Ray LaHood, United States Secretary of Transportation (2009–13), U.S. Representative from Illinois (1995–2009)[18]

Greg Mankiw, Chair of the Council of Economic Advisers (2003–05)[19]

Mel Martinez, United States Secretary of Housing and Urban Development (2001–03); United States Senator from Florida (2005–09); General Chair of the Republican National Committee (2007)[20][21]

Michael Mukasey, United States Attorney General (2007–09)[22]

John Negroponte, United States Ambassador to the United Nations (2001–04); Director of National Intelligence (2005–07); United States Deputy Secretary of State (2007–09) (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[12][17]

Henry Paulson, United States Secretary of the Treasury (2006–09) (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[23]

Rob Portman, Director of the Office of Management and Budget (2006–07); United States Trade Representative (2005–06); United States Senator from Ohio (2011–present) (withdrew endorsement, writing-in Mike Pence)[24]

Colin Powell, United States Secretary of State (2001–05), National Security Advisor (1987–89) (voting for Hillary Clinton)[25]

William K. Reilly, Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency (1989–92) (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[17]

Condoleezza Rice, United States Secretary of State (2005–09), National Security Advisor (2001–09) (called on Trump to withdraw candidacy)[26]

Tom Ridge, United States Secretary of Homeland Security (2003–05); Homeland Security Advisor (2001–03); Governor of Pennsylvania (1995–2001)[12][27][28]

William Ruckelshaus, Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency (1970–73, 1983–85) (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[17]

George P. Shultz, United States Secretary of Labor (1969–70); Director of the Office of Management and Budget (1970–72); United States Secretary of the Treasury (1972–74); United States Secretary of State (1982–89)[19]

Louis Wade Sullivan, United States Secretary of Health and Human Services (1989–93) (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[29]

Christine Todd Whitman, Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency (2001–03); Governor of New Jersey (1994–2001) (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[30]

Robert Zoellick, United States Deputy Secretary of State (2005–06); U.S. Trade Representative (2001–05); President of the World Bank Group (2007–12)[12]

Governors[edit]

Current

Ohio Governor John Kasich

Charlie Baker, Massachusetts (2015–present)[31]

Robert J. Bentley, Alabama (2011–present) (withdrew endorsement)[32]

Dennis Daugaard, South Dakota (2011–present) (withdrew endorsement, called on Trump to withdraw his candidacy)[33]

Bill Haslam, Tennessee (2011–present)[34]

Gary Herbert, Utah (2009–present) (withdrew endorsement)[35]

Larry Hogan, Maryland (2015–present)[36][37]

Susana Martinez, New Mexico (2011–present); Chair of the Republican Governors Association (2015–present)[38]

Brian Sandoval, Nevada (2011–present) (withdrew endorsement)[39]

Rick Snyder, Michigan (2011–present)[40]

Former

Former Massachusetts Governor and 2012 nominee for President Mitt Romney

Arne Carlson, Minnesota (1991–99) (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[17]

A. Linwood Holton Jr., Virginia (1970–74); Assistant Secretary of State for Legislative Affairs (1974–75) (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[41]

Jon Huntsman Jr., Utah (2005–09); United States Ambassador to China (2009–11); United States Ambassador to Singapore (1992–93) (withdrew endorsement)[42]

William Milliken, Michigan (1969–83) (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[43]

Kay A. Orr, Nebraska (1987–91)[44]

Tim Pawlenty, Minnesota (2003–11) (withdrew endorsement)[45]

Marc Racicot, Montana (1993–01); Chair of the Republican National Committee (2001–03)[46]

Mitt Romney, Massachusetts (2003–07), 2012 nominee for President[47]

Arnold Schwarzenegger, California (2003–11)[48]

William Weld, Massachusetts (1991–97) (2016 Libertarian nominee for Vice President)[49]

U.S. Senators[edit]

Arizona Senator and 2008 nominee for President John McCain

Current

Kelly Ayotte, New Hampshire (2011–present) (withdrew intended vote, writing-in Mike Pence)[50]

Shelley Moore Capito, West Virginia (2015–present) (withdrew endorsement)[51]

Susan Collins, Maine (1997–present)[52]

Jeff Flake, Arizona (2013–present) (called on Trump to withdraw his candidacy)[53][54]

Cory Gardner, Colorado (2015–present) (withdrew endorsement, called on Trump to withdraw his candidacy, writing-in Mike Pence)[55]

Dean Heller, Nevada (2011–present)[56]

Mark Kirk, Illinois (2010–present) (withdrew endorsement, writing-in Colin Powell)[37]

Mike Lee, Utah (2011–present)[57]

John McCain, Arizona (1987–present); 2008 nominee for President (withdrew endorsement)[58]

Lisa Murkowski, Alaska (2002–present) (called on Trump to withdraw his candidacy)[59]

Rob Portman, Ohio (2010-present) [60]

Ben Sasse, Nebraska (2015–present)[20][61]

Dan Sullivan, Alaska (2015–present) (withdrew endorsement, called on Trump to withdraw candidacy, writing-in Mike Pence)[62]

John Thune, South Dakota (2005–present) (withdrew endorsement, called on Trump to withdraw candidacy)[63]

Former

Norm Coleman, Minnesota (2003–09)[28][64]

David Durenberger, Minnesota (1978–95) (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[17]

Slade Gorton, Washington (1981–87, 1989–2001) (endorsed Evan McMullin)[65]

Gordon J. Humphrey, New Hampshire (1979–90) (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[66][67]

John Warner, Virginia (1979–2009); United States Secretary of the Navy (1972–74) (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[68]

U.S. Representatives[edit]

Nevada U.S. Representative and 2016 nominee for U.S. Senate Joe Heck

Current

Justin Amash, Michigan (2011–present)[28]

Mike Coffman, Colorado (2009–present)[69]

Barbara Comstock, Virginia (2015–present)[70]

Carlos Curbelo, Florida (2015–present)[20][71]

Rodney Davis, Illinois (2013–present) (withdrew endorsement)[72]

Charlie Dent, Pennsylvania (2005–present)[73]

Bob Dold, Illinois (2011–13, 2015–present)[28][74]

Jeff Fortenberry, Nebraska (2005–present) (withdrew endorsement)[72]

Scott Garrett, New Jersey (2003–present) (withdrew endorsement)[72]

Kay Granger, Texas (1997–present) (called on Trump to withdraw his candidacy)[75]

Richard L. Hanna, New York (2011–present) (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[28][76]

Cresent Hardy, Nevada (2015–present) (withdrew endorsement)[77]

Joe Heck, Nevada (2011–present); 2016 nominee for U.S. Senate (withdrew endorsement)[77]

Jaime Herrera Beutler, Washington (2011–present) (writing-in Paul Ryan)[78]

Will Hurd, Texas (2015–present)[79]

David Jolly, Florida (2014–present)[80]

John Katko, New York (2015–present)[81]

Adam Kinzinger, Illinois (2011–present)[82]

Steve Knight, California (2015–present)[83]

Frank LoBiondo, New Jersey (1995–present) (withdrew endorsement, writing-in Mike Pence)[84]

Mia Love, Utah (2015–present)[85]

Pat Meehan, Pennsylvania (2011–present) (called on Trump to withdraw his candidacy)[84]

Erik Paulsen, Minnesota (2009–present) (withdrew endorsement)[86]

Reid Ribble, Wisconsin (2011–present)[28]

Scott Rigell, Virginia (2011–present) (endorsed Gary Johnson)[20]

Martha Roby, Alabama (2011–present) (called on Trump to withdraw his candidacy)[87][88]

Tom Rooney, Florida (2009–present) (withdrew endorsement)[72]

Ileana Ros-Lehtinen, Florida (1989–present)[28]

Mike Simpson, Idaho (1999–present) (withdrew endorsement)[10]

Fred Upton, Michigan (1987–present)[89]

David Valadao, California (2013–present)[90]

Ann Wagner, Missouri (2013–present) (withdrew endorsement)[91]

Host of Morning Joe on MSNBC and former U.S. Representative from Florida Joe Scarborough

Former

Steve Bartlett, Texas (1983–91)[92]

Bob Bauman, Maryland (1973–81)[92]

Sherwood Boehlert, New York (1993–2007) (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[93]

Jack Buechner, Missouri (1987–91)[92]

Tom Campbell, California (1989–93, 1995–2001) (endorsed Gary Johnson)[94]

Bill Clinger, Pennsylvania (1979–97)[92]

Tom Coleman, Missouri (1976–93)[92]

Geoff Davis, Kentucky (2005–12)[92]

Mickey Edwards, Oklahoma (1977–93)[92]

Harris Fawell, Illinois (1985–99)[92]

Ed Foreman, Texas (1963–65, 1969–71)[92]

Amo Houghton, New York (1987–2005)[92]

Bob Inglis, South Carolina (1993–99, 2005–11)[28]

Jim Kolbe, Arizona (1985–2007) (endorsed Gary Johnson)[95]

Steve Kuykendall, California (1999–2001)[92]

Jim Leach, Iowa (1977–2007)[92]

Pete McCloskey, California (1967–83)[92]

Connie Morella, Maryland (1987–2003) (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[17]

Mike Parker, Mississippi (1989–99); Assistant Secretary of the Army for Civil Works (2001–02)[92]

Ron Paul, Texas (1976–77, 1979–85, 1997–2013)[96]

Tom Petri, Wisconsin (1979–2015)[92]

John Porter, Illinois (1980–2001)[92]

Joe Scarborough, Florida (1995–2001); commentator and author[97]

Claudine Schneider, Rhode Island (1981–91) (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[93]

Chris Shays, Connecticut (1987–2009) (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[17]

Peter Smith, Vermont (1989–11)[92]

Mark Souder, Indiana (1995–2010)[98]

J.C. Watts, Oklahoma (1995–2003)[20]

Edward Weber, Ohio (1981–83)[92]

Vin Weber, Minnesota (1983–93)[99]

G. William Whitehurst, Virginia (1969–87)[92]

Dick Zimmer, New Jersey (1991–97) (endorsed Gary Johnson)[100]

Former State Department officials[edit]

Richard Armitage, Deputy Secretary of State; Assistant Secretary of Defense for International Security Affairs (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[101]

John B. Bellinger III, Legal Adviser of the Department of State; Legal Adviser to the National Security Council[12]

Robert Blackwill, United States Ambassador to India; Deputy National Security Advisor for Strategic Planning (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[12][17]

R. Nicholas Burns, Under Secretary of State for Political Affairs; United States Ambassador to NATO; United States Ambassador to Greece (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[102]

Eliot A. Cohen, Counselor of the United States Department of State[12][20]

Chester Crocker, Assistant Secretary of State for African Affairs[22]

Jendayi Frazer, Assistant Secretary of State for African Affairs[12]

James K. Glassman, Under Secretary of State for Public Diplomacy and Public Affairs (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[22]

David F. Gordon, Director of Policy Planning[12]

Donald Gregg, United States Ambassador to South Korea[19]

David A. Gross, U.S. Coordinator for International Communications and Information Policy (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[17]

John Hillen, Assistant Secretary of State for Political-Military Affairs[12]

Reuben Jeffery III, Under Secretary of State for Economic Growth, Energy, and the Environment[12]

Robert Joseph, Under Secretary of State for Arms Control and International Security Affairs[22]

David J. Kramer, Assistant Secretary of State for Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor[12]

Stephen D. Krasner, Director of Policy Planning[22]

Frank Lavin, United States Ambassador to Singapore; Under Secretary of Commerce for International Trade (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[17]

Robert McCallum, United States Ambassador to Australia; Acting United States Deputy Attorney General[12]

Richard Miles, United States Ambassador to Azerbaijan, Bulgaria, and Georgia; Acting United States Ambassador to Kyrgyzstan[22]

Roger Noriega, Assistant Secretary of State for Western Hemisphere Affairs[22]

John Osborn, Member of the U.S. Advisory Commission on Public Diplomacy[22]

Kristen Silverberg, Assistant Secretary of State for International Organization Affairs[12]

William Howard Taft IV, Legal Adviser of the Department of State; United States Ambassador to NATO; United States Deputy Secretary of Defense[12]

Shirin R. Tahir-Kheli, Senior Advisor for Women’s Empowerment; Special Assistant to the President for Democracy, Human Rights and International Operations (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[12][17]

Betty Tamposi, Assistant Secretary of State for Consular Affairs (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[103]

Peter Teeley, United States Ambassador to Canada (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[17]

Robert Tuttle, United States Ambassador to the United Kingdom (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[104]

Philip Zelikow, Counselor of the United States Department of State[12]

Former Defense Department officials[edit]

Don Bacon, Brigadier General, United States Air Force; 2016 nominee for Nebraska’s 2nd district (called on Trump to withdraw his candidacy)[105]

Seth Cropsey, Assistant Secretary of Defense for Special Operations/Low Intensity Conflict & Interdependent Capabilities[22]

Michael B. Donley, United States Secretary of the Air Force (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[17]

Eric Edelman, Under Secretary of Defense for Policy[12]

Doug Feith, Under Secretary of Defense for Policy[106]

Robert Hastings, Acting Assistant to the Secretary of Defense for Public Affairs[22]

Tim Kane, United States Air Force intelligence officer; Chief Labor Economist, Joint Economic Committee[22]

Mary Beth Long, Assistant Secretary of Defense for International Security Affairs[12]

Alberto J. Mora, General Counsel of the Navy (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[17]

Gale Pollock, Acting Surgeon General of the United States Army (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[17]

Martha Rainville, Major General, United States Air Force; Vermont Adjutant General[22]

Michael Rubin, Defense Country Director for Iran and Iraq[22]

Kalev Sepp, Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Special Operations Capabilities[22]

Matthew Waxman, Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Detainee Affairs (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[10][12]

Paul Wolfowitz, United States Deputy Secretary of Defense; President of the World Bank Group (voting for Clinton)[107]

Dov Zakheim, Comptroller of the Department of Defense[12]

Former National Security officials[edit]

Ken Adelman, Director of the Arms Control and Disarmament Agency (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[10][22]

Mike Baker, covert operations officer, Central Intelligence Agency[22]

Tom Donnelly, Director of the Policy Group, House Armed Services Committee[22]

Gary Edson, Deputy National Security Advisor[12]

Richard Falkenrath, Deputy Homeland Security Advisor[12]

Peter Feaver, Senior Director for Strategic Planning[12]

Aaron Friedberg, Deputy National Security Advisor to the Vice President[12]

Greg Garcia, Assistant Secretary of Homeland Security for Cyber Security and Telecommunications[22]

Michael Green, Senior Director for Asia, National Security Council[12]

Paul Haenle, Director for China and Taiwan, National Security Council[12]

Michael Hayden, Director of the Central Intelligence Agency (2006–09)[12]

William Inboden, Senior Director for Strategic Planning, National Security Council[12]

James Jeffrey, Deputy National Security Advisor[12]

James C. Langdon, Jr., Chair of the President’s Intelligence Advisory Board[12]

Deborah Loewer, Director of the White House Situation Room (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[108]

Evan McMullin, Operations officer, Central Intelligence Agency; Senior Adviser for National Security, House Foreign Affairs Committee (Independent candidate for President)[109][110]

Paul D. Miller, Director for Afghanistan, National Security Council[22]

Meghan O’Sullivan, Deputy National Security Advisor for Iraq and Afghanistan[12]

Kori Schake, Director of Defense Strategy, National Security Council[12]

Gary Schmitt, Executive Director of the President’s Intelligence Advisory Board[22]

Brent Scowcroft, National Security Advisor (1975–77, 1989–93); Chair of the President’s Intelligence Advisory Board (2001–05) (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[17]

David Shedd, Deputy Director of National Intelligence; Acting Director of the Defense Intelligence Agency[22]

Stephen Slick, Senior Director for Intelligence Programs, National Security Council[12]

Frances Townsend, Homeland Security Advisor[22]

Kenneth Wainstein, Homeland Security Advisor[12]

Other former federal government officials[edit]

Former Chief of Staff to the Vice President and founder of The Weekly Standard Bill Kristol

Donald B. Ayer, United States Deputy Attorney General[12]

Phillip D. Brady, White House Staff Secretary; White House Cabinet Secretary (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[108]

Paul K. Charlton, United States Attorney[111]

Linda Chavez, Director of the Office of Public Liaison; 1986 nominee for U.S. Senator from Maryland[28]

Jim Cicconi, White House Staff Secretary (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[17]

Scott Evertz, Director of the Office of National AIDS Policy (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[17]

Tony Fratto, Deputy White House Press Secretary[112]

Charles Fried, United States Solicitor General; Associate Justice of the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[113]

Fred T. Goldberg, Jr., Assistant Secretary of the Treasury for Tax Policy; Commissioner of Internal Revenue (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[17]

Hugh Hewitt, Assistant White House Counsel; conservative radio host (called on Trump to withdraw his candidacy)[114]

Theodore Kassinger, United States Deputy Secretary of Commerce[12]

Bill Kristol, Chief of Staff to the Vice President (endorsed Evan McMullin)[115]

Rosario Marin, Treasurer of the United States (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[116]

John McKay, former United States Attorney (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[117]

Andrew Natsios, Administrator of the United States Agency for International Development; Chair of the Massachusetts Republican Party[12]

Daniel F. Runde, Director of the Global Development Alliance[22]

Larry D. Thompson, United States Deputy Attorney General[12]

Dan Webb, former United States Attorney (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[118]

Peter Wehner, Director of the Office of Strategic Initiatives[10]

Lezlee Westine, Director of the Office of Public Liaison (2001–2005) (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[99][119]

Peter Zeidenberg, Assistant United States Attorney[111]

Statewide officials[edit]

Current

Brian Calley, Lieutenant Governor of Michigan (2011–present) (called on Trump to withdraw his candidacy)[120]

Spencer Cox, Lieutenant Governor of Utah (2013–present)[121]

Kim Guadagno, Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey (2010–present)[122]

Former

Paul Anderson, Associate Justice of the Minnesota Supreme Court (1994–2013) (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[123]

Greg Bell, Lieutenant Governor of Utah (2009–13) (endorsed Evan McMullin)[124]

Bob Brown, Secretary of State of Montana (2001–05) (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[125]

Betty Montgomery, Attorney General of Ohio (1995–2003), Ohio State Auditor (2003–07)[126]

Mark Shurtleff, Attorney General of Utah (2001–13) (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[127]

Robert Smith, Associate Judge of the New York Court of Appeals (2004–14) (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[128]

Michael Steele, Lieutenant Governor of Maryland (2003–07) and RNC Chair (2009–11)[129]

Diana Taylor, New York Superintendent of Banks (2003–07) (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[130]

Grant Woods, Attorney General of Arizona (1991–99) (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[131]

State legislators[edit]

Current

Jack Ciattarelli, New Jersey State Representative (2011–present) (withdrew endorsement)[122]

Kurt Daudt, Minnesota State Representative (2011–present), Speaker of the Minnesota House of Representatives (2015–present) (called on Trump to withdraw his candidacy)[132]

David Johnson, Iowa State Senator (2003–present)[37][133]

Mark B. Madsen, Utah State Senator (2005–present) (endorsed Gary Johnson)[134]

Charisse Millett, Alaska State Representative (2009–present), Majority Leader (2015–present) (withdrew endorsement)[135][136]

Ross Spano, Florida State Representative (2012–present)[80]

Joe Sweeney, New Hampshire State Representative (2012–present) (withdrew endorsement)[137]

Former

Lois Sherman Hagarty, Pennsylvania State Representative (1980–92)[138]

Brian Lees, Massachusetts State Senator (1989–2007), Minority Leader (1993–2007)[139]

Jack McGregor, Pennsylvania State Senator (1963–70) (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[108]

Will Weatherford, Florida State Representative (2006–14), Speaker of the Florida House of Representatives (2012–14)[140]

Municipal officials[edit]

Joel Giambra, former Erie County Executive (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[141]

Carlos A. Giménez, Mayor of Miami-Dade County (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[142]

Danny Jones, Mayor of Charleston, West Virginia (endorsed Gary Johnson)[143][144]

Aimee Winder Newton, Member of the Salt Lake County Council (withdrew endorsement)[145]

Tomás Regalado, Mayor of Miami[146]

Other notable individuals[edit]

Republican Party figures[edit]

George Will, conservative commentator

Steve Baer, fundraiser[147]

Max Boot, author (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[28]

Ellen Bork, political consultant[22]

Marvin Bush, son of George H. W. Bush, brother of George W. Bush and Jeb Bush (endorsed Gary Johnson)[148]

Al Cardenas, former chair of the Republican Party of Florida[72]

Patrick Chovanec, economist[22]

Mindy Finn, political consultant, strategist, and activist (Independent running mate for Evan McMullin)[149]

Darryl Glenn, 2016 nominee for U.S. Senator from Colorado (withdrew endorsement)[150]

Juan Hernandez, political consultant, co-founder of Hispanic Republicans of Texas (endorsed Gary Johnson)[151]

Matt Higgins, former press secretary for New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[17]

Robert Kagan, former foreign policy advisor and speechwriter (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[28]

Matt Kibbe, libertarian ideals advocate[28]

Jimmy LaSalvia, co-founder of GOProud (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[17]

Kevin Madden, spokesperson for 2012 presidential nominee, Mitt Romney[20]

Ken Mehlman, former Chair of the Republican National Committee[28]

Mike Murphy, political consultant and commentator (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[152]

Patrick Ruffini, political strategist[28]

Mark Salter, chief aide to John McCain (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[153]

Randy Scheunemann, national security and foreign policy advisor[22]

Steve Schmidt, campaign strategist[154]

Gabriel Schoenfeld, former Senior Advisor to 2012 presidential nominee Mitt Romney[28]

Lionel Sosa, political consultant (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[155]

A. J. Spiker, Chair of the Iowa Republican Party[156]

Ben Stein, former speechwriter for Richard Nixon and Gerald Ford[28]

Stuart Stevens, political consultant and strategist[28]

Mac Stipanovich, strategist and lobbyist; former Chief of Staff to Bob Martinez (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[157]

John Weaver, strategist (called on Trump and Pence to withdraw their candidacies)[158]

Conservative academics, journalists and commentators[edit]

Michael Auslin, Resident Scholar and Director of Japanese Studies at the American Enterprise Institute[22]

Glenn Beck, former Fox News host, radio host, columnist, and author (endorsed Darrell Castle)[159]

Guy Benson, journalist[112]

Michael Berry, radio host[28]

L. Brent Bozell III, activist and writer[28]

David Brooks, columnist[160]

Christine Caine, evangelical author[161]

Steven G. Calabresi, legal scholar and co-founder of the Federalist Society[162]

Mona Charen, columnist and author[28]

Lanhee Chen, academic and commentator[19]

Joshua Claybourn, attorney, author, and former convention delegate[163][164]

Ross Douthat, columnist[37]

Daniel W. Drezner, blogger[22]

Richard Epstein, legal scholar[162]

Erick Erickson, blogger (endorsed Evan McMullin)[165]

Niall Ferguson, professor of history[22]

David A. French, author and journalist[37]

Jeffrey Gedmin, author[22]

Robert P. George, academic[19]

Reuel Marc Gerecht, writer (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[22]

Jonah Goldberg, columnist and author (endorsed Evan McMullin)[166]

Michael Graham, radio host[112]

Mary R. Habeck, professor of strategic studies[22]

David Harsanyi, columnist[112]

Stephen F. Hayes, columnist[112]

Quin Hillyer, columnist[28]

Charles Krauthammer, columnist (writing in Paul Ryan or Ben Sasse)[167]

Matt K. Lewis, columnist and commentator[168]

Dana Loesch, author and commentator[169]

Peter Mansoor, military historian (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[22]

Beth Moore, evangelical author[161]

Russell D. Moore, evangelical theologian, head of the Southern Baptist Convention’s Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission (writing-in Ben Sasse)[19][170]

Charles Murray, political scientist and commentator[171]

Ana Navarro, srategist and commentator[172]

Tom Nichols, national security affairs scholar (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[22]

John Noonan, national security analyst and commentator[173][174]

Marvin Olasky, editor-in-chief of World[175]

Mackubin Thomas Owens, national security advisor[22]

Katie Pavlich, journalist[28]

Daniel Pipes, historian and columnist[22]

Danielle Pletka, foreign policy writer[176]

John Podhoretz, writer and columnist[19]

Dorothy Rabinowitz, journalist (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[177]

Jennifer Rubin, journalist[28]

Ben Shapiro, columnist and commentator[28]

Bret Stephens, journalist[19]

Ray Takeyh, Senior Fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations[22]

Ruth Wedgwood, professor of international law and diplomacy[22]

Jamie Weinstein, political journalist[37]

Montel Williams, talk show host and commentator[178]

George Will, columnist[179][180]

Kevin D. Williamson, writer[181]

Business leaders[edit]

Meg Whitman, current HP and former eBay CEO

Daniel Akerson, former Chairman and CEO of General Motors (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[182][183]

Marc Andreessen, co-founder of Netscape; founder of Andreessen Horowitz (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[184]

Mike Fernandez, founder of MBF Healthcare Partners (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[185]

Seth Klarman, founder of Baupost Group (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[19][186]

Hamid R. Moghadam, CEO of Prologis (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[184]

James Murren, Chairman and CEO of MGM Resorts International (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[187]

Chuck Robbins, CEO of Cisco Systems (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[184]

Paul Singer, founder and CEO of Elliott Management Corporation[188]

Harry E. Sloan, former CEO of Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[17]

Jack Welch, former CEO of General Electric (withdrew endorsement)[189]

Meg Whitman, CEO of Hewlett Packard Enterprise; former CEO of eBay; 2010 California nominee for Governor of California (endorsed Hillary Clinton)[17][19][190]

Republican groups[edit]

Harvard Republican Club[191]

Penn State College Republicans[192]

Kenyon Republicans[193]

Cornell College Republicans (endorsed Gary Johnson)[194]

New Mexico College Republicans (endorsed Gary Johnson)[195]

Log Cabin Republicans[196]

See wikipedia’s article for the footnotes, in order to find details about any one of these leading Republicans who are supporting the neoconservatives’ champion, Hillary Clinton.

—————

Investigative historian Eric Zuesse is the author, most recently, of  They’re Not Even Close: The Democratic vs. Republican Economic Records, 1910-2010, and of  CHRIST’S VENTRILOQUISTS: The Event that Created Christianity.

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  • Charlie Primero

    NeoCon warmongers know their gravy train is about to end when Hillary loses.

  • Lynn Walker

    Sounds like a ringing endorsement. I have no real options, but I’m definitely in favor of whomever this cadre of criminals don’t want. It would be too much to hope for, but I’d like to see that entire list arrested and tried for their crimes against humanity, treason against the US citizens, etc.

  • Yes, spurned by all them Republicans. All those old school and establishment Republicans, yet not by a far-right Republican. Can you bother to ask yourself why?