Which Items Will Disappear First During A Major National Emergency?

End Times Ruins Apocalypse - Public DomainOne day in the not too distant future, a major emergency will strike this nation, and that will set off a round of hoarding unlike anything we have ever seen before.  Just think about what happens when a big winter storm or a hurricane is about to hit one of our major cities – inevitably store shelves are stripped bare of bread, milk, snow shovels, etc.  Even though winter storms and hurricanes are just temporary hurdles to overcome, they still cause many people to go into panic mode.  So what is going to happen when we have a real crisis on our hands?

We can get some clues about which items will disappear first during a major national emergency by taking a look at where such a scenario is already playing out.  One recent survey found that over 80 percent of all basic foodstuffs are currently unavailable in Venezuela, and about half the country can no longer provide three meals a day for their families.  Thankfully, some stores still have a few things that they are able to offer, but other key items are completely gone.  The following comes from USA Today

Oh, there are some things to buy. Besides salt, there are fresh vegetables and fruits, dairy products but no milk, some cereal, lots of snacks and a few canned goods.

The only meat is sausages; there are three kinds of cheese. The only problem: A kilogram of each costs more than a fourth of our monthly minimum wage of 15,050 bolivars.

But basic foodstuffs – the things most Venezuelans want to eat  such as corn meal, wheat flour, pasta, rice, milk, eggs, sugar, coffee, chicken, mayonnaise, margarine, cooking oil and beef – are conspicuous by their absence. And there is no toilet paper, no sanitary napkins, no disposable baby diapers, no shampoo, no toothpaste, no hand soap and no deodorant.

Do you have plenty of the items in bold above stored up?

If not, you may want to stock up while you still can.

Venezuela was once the wealthiest nation in all of South America, but now lines for food often begin as early as three in the morning.  Some people have become so desperate that they are actually hunting cats, dogs and pigeons for food, and there are even a few very sick people that have been killing and eating zoo animals.

Someday similar things will happen in the United States and Europe too.

When that day arrives, will you be prepared?

One of the things that got my attention from the article quote above was the lack of milk.  My wife is always telling me that we should store up more dried milk, and I believe that she is right.

Just imagine not having any milk and not being able to get any more.

What would you do?

Another thing that really stood out to me in the article was the fact that there is a severe shortage of personal hygiene items.  Most people don’t really think of those as “prepper goods”, but the truth is that life will become very uncomfortable without them very rapidly.

What would you do if there was no more toilet paper?

And if you have a little one, how are you going to manage without any diapers?

In general, it is wise to always have an extra supply of just about everything that you use on a daily basis stored away somewhere in your home.  The generation that went through the Great Depression of the 1930s understood this concept very well, but most of us that are younger have had it so good for so long that we don’t even really grasp what a real crisis looks like.

Another thing that we are seeing happen right now in Venezuela is the rise of a barter economy

Many of my urban friends are now planting vegetables in their outdoor spaces – if they have any – or in pots. Another friend, who is a hairdresser, is charging clients food to do their hair. For a shampoo and dry, she charges a kilo of corn meal, saying that she doesn’t have time to stand in line like some of her clients.

As you prepare for what is ahead, you may want to consider stocking up on some items that would specifically be used for bartering in a crisis situation.

For example, you may not drink coffee, but there are millions upon millions of people that do.  In a crisis situation, there will be many that will be extremely desperate to get their hands on some coffee, and so any coffee that you store away now may become a very valuable asset.

We live in a world where one out of every eight people already goes to bed hungry each night, and where one out of every three children is underweight.  As global weather patterns become more extreme, as natural disasters continue to become more frequent and more intense, and as terror and war continue to spread, it is inevitable that the stress on the global food system is going to continue to grow.

Today you can waltz into Wal-Mart and buy giant cartloads of very inexpensive food, but it will not always be that way.

Unfortunately, more than half the country is currently living paycheck to paycheck, and most Americans do not have any emergency food stored up at all.

In addition to food and personal hygiene supplies, here are some other items that are likely to disappear very rapidly during a major national emergency…

-Flashlights

-Batteries

-Generators

-Propane

-Can Openers

-Water Filters

-Water Containers

-Anything Related To Self-Defense

-Axes

-Knives

-Sleeping Bags

-Tents

-First Aid Kits

-Matches

-Candles

-Firewood

-Shovels

-Bottled Water

-Warm Clothing

-Lanterns

-Portable Radios

So in addition to food and personal hygiene items, you may want to do an inventory of the items that I have listed above and see where you may have some holes in your preparation plans.

I understand that there will be some people that will read this article and think that all of us “preppers” are being just a tad ridiculous.

But when a major emergency strikes this nation and you haven’t done anything to prepare, you will dearly wish that you had bothered to take action while there was still time remaining to do so.

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  • MrLiberty

    Not to make light of the predictable failure of this socialist economy, but the availability of fresh fruits and vegetables along with a marked absence of corn meal, wheat flour, pasta, rice, milk, eggs, sugar, coffee, chicken, mayonnaise, margarine, cooking oil and beef doesn’t sound like the worst fate for a country. Given the near 100% GMO presence in corn and wheat items, the unhealthy nature of most of the rest of the list, the overconsumption of animal products (nearly all of which are raised in such unhealthy manners), this might be a good thing for overall health. Of course the truth is that the lack of these other items will only put a huge strain on the fresh produce leading to shortages of this inevitably as production is not prepared to meed the increased demands and a growing season will be required to respond.

    The key takehome is that central planning OF ANY SORT will always be a failure. And NO country is immune, not even the US with its ever-growing central planning apparatus. ALL GOVERNMENT solutions to ALL problems MUST be rejected. People, free of political manipulation, will ALWAYS solve problems and deliver superior outcomes to government’s predictable failures.

    Also, great list of items to have on hand.

    • diogenes

      In America people confront two (or is it three) governments: the official one and the economic government of finance and corporate monopolies. “Freeing” people of the official government without freeing us also from the even more pervasive and predatory private government of the economic oligarchy is, in plain English, bullshit. Is it sheer ignorance, an unwillingness to confront obvious facts, or a hidden agenda that leads people like “Mr. Liberty” to avoid this basic reality entirely? Is this the screed of a fool or a shill? Certainly the oligarchy has made use of this kind of rhetoric for a century and more — “rugged individualism” it was called in the 20s. And then came the 30s. But Mr. Liberty & his like are still stuck in the 20s.

  • tom

    “…there are even a few very sick people that have been killing and eating zoo animals”.

    It seems rather hypocritical to call those people “sick” – unless you mean that eating the exotic zoo animals made them sick.

    What would you do, if you were faced by a straight choice between killing and eating zoo animals and starving to death – or, worse, having your children starve to death?

    Frankly, animals are animals. Prosperous Americans may think it “sick” to kill and eat zoo animals, but beggars can’t be choosers.

    • Klaus Mertz

      Americans are a race of slobs, obese, addicted to all sorts of prescribed medications, OTC medicines and synthetic vitamins, extremely gullible and unable to think for themselves (trained not to think critically); moreover, these subhumans are feed with GMO foods, meals that are fully responsible for all major diseases and their offspring sre treated like lab rats by experimenting with new vaccines all the time…for the reasons addressed before, it is valid to assert that these people are indeed a true insult to the human race and destined to perish during a major national emergency

      • Robert McMaster

        Yes! It’s an Emergency if you keep eating all this crap while it’s available. What, you have to have an Emergency to just possibly eat like a ‘human being’. No Cheetos, no Chocko-O-Bars. What ever will Americans do? This would thin the herd.

  • Benji0804

    Ever time a snow storm happens the grocery stores are out of food within a day or two.
    It does not take much even on a tight budget to have a 3 months supply of canned goods and food
    that can be cooked on a grill.
    As for lighting when the power goes out I like using led strip lighting hooked up to a usb battery.

  • Charlie Primero

    I lived without EMS or Police services for six days after Hurricane Rita. I listened on my police scanner as cops refused to answer 911 calls because they had no gasoline.

    It’s a weird feeling to stand in the middle of your street with a rifle and know you can do *anything you want* without police molestation. 🙂

    You should have all the usual Prepper stuff, but know that Gasoline is the first thing to go. Without gasoline I was unable to drive to my elderly parents house to help them. Now I have a large collection of gasoline jugs in my attic (30 gallons worth). At the first sign of trouble, I go fill them. After the crisis, I put the fuel in my cars over the next week.

    The second most important thing is to arrange mutual security agreements with your neighbors beforehand. Refugees will loot anything not nailed down as they pass by. Neighbors help each other prevent this.

    • Great practical advise and words of wisdom from someone who has been there and done that. Thanks’ for sharing this with everybody today Charlie Primero. Not preparing is preparing to fail!

  • You will not read about this anywhere else these days!

    August 16, 2016 Pentagon Cannot Account For $6.5 Trillion Dollars

    A new Department of Defense Inspector General’s report, released last week, has left Americans stunned at the jaw-dropping lack of accountability and oversight. The glaring report revealed the Pentagon couldn’t account for $6.5 trillion dollars worth of Army general fund transactions and data, according to a report by the Fiscal Times.

    http://www.globalresearch.ca/pentagon-cannot-account-for-6-5-trillion-dollars/5541244

  • dus7

    FWIW the soap, shampoo, lotion, deodorant, toothpaste, etc.-type things are already bring made at home by those who want natural, safer ingredients for less cost – there are lots of recipes online. Back in the day I used cloth diapers for my babies so it’s just a matter of water and soap (and clothesline). I believe our female ancestors used cloth for their personal needs also. (And before cheap fabric, what did millennia of adult female humans use? Moss or something? Another fun research project.)

    It comes down to clean water, nighttime lighting, matches, solar batteries for radio communication, first aid supplies and any meds one needs, gardens, firewood, bicycles, fishnet/ traps/ .22 rifle, and lots of dried and canned foods. And get to know your neighbors. (Former AK ‘homesteader’.)