Fast Track the Good Stuff

The U.S. Senate has been very concerned not to let peace with Iran slip into place too easily, even while a new war in Iraq and Syria proceeds without the formal pretense of Congress “authorizing” or rejecting it.

Both houses of Congress are interested in ramming through the TPP (Trans-Pacific Partnership) on a fast track. The fast track procedure of rushing things through Congress or creating them without Congress seems to be reserved for the least popular ideas our government produces.

What if, instead, a fast track were set up for those items favored by a vast majority of the public, or required for the future habitability of the planet, but which meet resistance from campaign funders, lobbyists, and the corporate media?

Of course I’d rather have clean elections and a publicly accountable Congress if we can’t have public initiatives and direct democracy. But in the absence of such utopias, why not use extreme anti-democratic measures to ram through the things people want rather than the things we’d protest if we found out about them? Why not slip one past the plutocrats rather than slipping one past the people? Why not go with voice votes, no debate, and no time to read the details on measures to demilitarize and protect the planet rather than on “trade” agreements that empower corporate lawyers to overturn laws?

I recently read this in an email newsletter from peace advocate Michael Nagler: “The other day I went to test-drive an electric car. When we got through some of the technicalities and were waiting for a red light the salesperson coming with me said, ‘So what do you do?’ Here it comes, I thought: ‘I work with a nonprofit; (gulp, and) we’re promoting nonviolence.’ After a reflective pause she said quietly, ‘Thank you.'”

I’ve often had that same experience, but increasingly I eagerly reply: “I work on abolishing war.” That’s what I replied recently in a sandwich shop here in Charlottesville called Baggby’s. I didn’t get a “thank you,” but I got a question as to whether I had known Jack Kidd. I had never heard of Jack Kidd, but Jack Kidd, a retired two-star Air Force general who lived in Charlottesville, had been in Baggby’s in the past debating the need to abolish war with some other bigwig general who favored keeping war and militarism going.

So, I read Kidd’s book, Prevent War: A New Strategy for America. Of course, I think we need a strategy for earth, not for the United States, if we are going to end war. Kidd, who died in 2013, believed in 2000, when the book was published, that only the United States could lead the way toward peace, that the United States had always meant well, that war could be used to end war, and all sorts of things I can’t bring myself to take seriously. And yet, believing everything he still believed, after “waking up” in the early 1980s, as he describes it, Kidd came to recognize the insanity of failing to work for the abolition of war.

This was a man who had bombed German cities in World War II; who believed he’d survived a particularly difficult mission during which he’d shot down lots of German planes, because he’d prayed to God who’d answered his prayer; who’d flown secret nuclear attack plans from Washington to Korea during the Korean war; who’d “served” as Chief of the Joint War Plans Branch and worked on plans for World War III; who believed in the Gulf of Tonkin attack; who had obeyed orders to knowingly fly his plane through nuclear clouds moments after bomb tests — as self-human experimentation; and yet . . . and yet! And yet Jack Kidd organized retired U.S. and Soviet generals to work for disarmament at the height of the Cold War.

Kidd’s book contains numerous proposals to move us away from war. One of them is to fast track disarmament agreements. For that idea alone, his book is worth reading. It’s also worth giving to the most hard-core war supporters as a sort of a gentle nudge. It’s also worth asking, I think, why Charlottesville has no memorial to this former General who’s layed out a plan for peace when it has so many to those whose only accomplishment was losing the U.S. Civil War.<--break->

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  • Eisenhower warns us of the military industrial complex.

    Dwight D. Eisenhower exit speech on Jan.17,1961.

    • nick quinlan

      And, here we are today, 54 years later, and the vast military complex, joined at the hip with Wall Street, the banks and corporations, complete with a corrupt and captured Congress, serving that military complex, and promoting foreign policy that demands endless wars and endless enemies, while waging an endless war of terror upon the world.