Renaming Afghan War, Renaming Murder

The U.S.-led NATO war on Afghanistan has lasted so long they’ve decided to rename it, declare the old war over, and announce a brand new war they’re just sure you’re going to love.

The war thus far has lasted as long as U.S. participation in World War II plus U.S. participation in World War I, plus the Korean War, plus the Spanish American War, plus the full length of the U.S. war on the Philippines, combined with the whole duration of the Mexican American War.

Now, some of those other wars accomplished things, I will admit — such as stealing half of Mexico. What has Operation Freedom’s Sentinel, formerly known as Operation Enduring Freedom, accomplished, other than enduring and enduring and enduring to the point where we’re numb enough to completely overlook a new name as Orwellian as Freedom’s Sentinel (what — was “Liberty’s Enslaver” already taken)?

Well, according to President Obama, over 13 years of bombing and occupying Afghanistan has made us safer. That seems like a claim someone should request some evidence for. The U.S. government has spent nearly a trillion dollars on this war, plus roughly 13 trillion dollars in standard military spending over 13 years, a rate of spending radically increased by using this war and related wars as the justification. Tens of billions of dollars could end starvation on earth, provide the globe with clean water, etc. We could have saved millions of lives and chose to kill thousands instead. The war has been a leading destroyer of the natural environment. We’ve tossed our civil liberties out the window in the name of “freedom.” We’ve produced so many weapons they’ve had to be shuffled off to local police departments, with predictable results. A claim that something good has come and is coming and will continue to come for many future years from this war is worth looking into.

Don’t look too closely. The CIA finds that a key component of the war (targeted drone murders — “murders” is their word) is counterproductive. Before the great opponent of war Fred Branfman died this year he collected a long list of statements by members of the U.S. government and military stating the same thing. That murdering people with drones tends to enrage their friends and families, producing more enemies than you eliminate, may become easier to understand after reading a study that recently found that when the U.S. targets a person for murder, it kills 27 additional people along the way. General Stanley McChrystal said that when you kill an innocent person you create 10 enemies. I’m not a mathematician, but I think that comes to about 270 enemies created each time someone is put on the kill list, or 280 if the person is or is widely believed to be innocent (of what it’s not exactly clear).

This war is counterproductive on its own terms. But what are those terms? Usually they are a declaration of vicious revenge and a condemnation of the rule of law — albeit dressed up to sound like something more respectable. It’s worth recalling here how this all began. The United States, for three years prior to September 11, 2001, had been asking the Taliban to turn over Osama bin Laden. The Taliban had asked for evidence of his guilt of any crimes and a commitment to try him in a neutral third country without the death penalty. This continued right into October, 2001. (See, for example “Bush Rejects Taliban Offer to Hand Bin Laden Over” in the Guardian, October 14, 2001.) The Taliban also warned the United States that bin Laden was planning an attack on U.S. soil (this according to the BBC). Former Pakistani Foreign Secretary Niaz Naik told the BBC that senior U.S. officials told him at a U.N.-sponsored summit in Berlin in July 2001 that the United States would take action against the Taliban in mid-October. He said it was doubtful that surrendering bin Laden would change those plans. When the United States attacked Afghanistan on October 7, 2001, the Taliban asked again to negotiate handing over bin Laden to a third country to be tried. The United States rejected the offer and continued a war on Afghanistan for many years, not halting it when bin Laden was believed to have left that country, and not even halting it after announcing bin Laden’s death.

So, in opposition to the rule of law, the United States and its accomplices have conducted a record-long killing spree that could have been avoided with a trial in 2001 or by never having armed and trained bin Laden and his associates in the 1980s or by never having provoked the Soviet Union into invading or by never having launched the Cold War, etc.

If this war has not accomplished safety — with polling around the globe finding the United States now viewed as the greatest threat to world peace — has it accomplished something else? Maybe. Or maybe it still can — especially if it is ended and prosecuted as a crime. What this war could still accomplish is the full removal of the distinction between war and what the CIA and the White House call what they’re doing in their own reports and legal memos: murder.

A German newspaper has just published a NATO kill list — a list similar to President Obama’s — of people targeted for murder. On the list are low-level fighters, and even non-fighting drug dealers. We really have replaced incarceration and the accompanying torture and law suits and moral crises and editorial hand-wringing with murder.

Why should murder be more acceptable than imprisonment and torture? Largely I think we’re leaning on the vestiges of a long-dead tradition still alive as mythology. War — which we absurdly imagine has always been and will always be — didn’t used to look like it does today. It did not used to be the case that 90 percent of the dead were non-combatants. We still talk about “battlefields,” but they’re used to actually be such things. Wars were arranged and planned for like sports matches. Ancient Greek armies could camp next to an enemy without fear of a surprise attack. Spaniards and Moors negotiated the dates for battles. California Indians used accurate arrows for hunting but arrows without feathers for ritual war. War’s history is one of ritual and of respect for the “worthy opponent.” George Washington could sneak up on the British, or Hessians, and kill them on Christmas night not because nobody had ever thought of crossing the Delaware before, but because that just wasn’t what one did.

Well, now it is. Wars are fought in people’s towns and villages and cities. Wars are murder on a massive scale. And the particular approach developed in Afghanistan and Pakistan by the U.S. military and CIA has the potential advantage of looking like murder to most people. May that motivate us to end it. May we resolve not to let this go on another decade or another year or another month. May we not engage in the pretense of talking about a mass murder as having ended just because the mass murderer has given the crime a new name. Thus far it is only the dead who have seen an end to the war on Afghanistan.

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  • B. Miles Teg

    Meanwhile the international criminal court continues to target brown people… Just like George Carlin ( https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UaS2bRGS86c ) put it so eloquently… From Ferguson to Iraq, from NYC to Somalia… Imperialism is NOT possible without tyranny at home…

  • Carl_Herman

    Thanks, David. This is the core of the .01%: murder, looting, and lying.

    Until our military lawfully refuses these Wars of Aggression, this is our “enduring freedom.”

  • Abner Doubleday

    Thanks, David, for writing the truth, as always. I just can’t believe the psychopathic insanity that passes for foreign and domestic policy. However, while I’ve lived an exemplary peaceful life to this point, I’m not so sure that I don’t see some value in taking a life in the name of justice — alas, I have seen no evidence that living peaceful, exemplary human lives results in justice. Let the criminals in power and their hired thugs beware. They molest a sleeping dragon. In the meantime, I expect we’ll just kill ourselves through collective arrogance and ignorance and all else that goes with the gloriously contrived economy of capitalism. Suicide by consumption and denial.

  • Rehmat

    Obama’s claims are nothing but usual PR crap to cover-up US-NATO’s military humiliation. 17,000 US-NATO occupation forces will remain in Afghanistan to maintain control over 300,000 US-trained Afghan foot-soldiers behind the scene. The daily life of Afghan citizens has gone worse than it was under the Russian or Taliban rule before December 2001. Taliban still control more than 70% of Afghan territory. Afghan civilians are being killed by US coward drone attacks on daily basis.

    It took Obama seven years to fulfill promise he made on October 28, 2007: “I will promise you this, that if we have not gotten our troops out of Afghanistan by the time I’m president, it’s the first thing I will do.”

    The US invasion of Afghanistan was a premeditated invasion of a sovereign state months ahead of Israeli terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. Afghanistan was attacked and occupied because Taliban became a hurdle to America’s greed for oil and drugs, and Israeli interests.

    On October 9, 2014, Manlio Dincuci, an Italian geopolitical scientist and author in an article claimed that the US-NATO have no intention of leaving Afghanistan to act as an independent functioning democracy.

    “US-Afghanistan agreement sought by Washington, frozen for nearly a year by President Karzai’s refusal to subscribe, was signed with great fanfare in Kabul on September 30, the day after Afghanistan’s new president Ashraf Ghani was sworn in. The “Security and Defense Cooperation Agreement ” – comprising, in addition to a preface and an annex, 26 items subdivided into 116 points – contains everything that Washington wanted to obtain,” said Dinucci.

    http://rehmat1.com/2014/12/31/obama-afghan-war-made-us-safer-and-more-secure/