No to Republibama Government

A case can be made that democracy worked in this month’s U.S. midterm elections, while representative democracy failed miserably.

On ballot initiatives all across the country, people in so-called red and blue states voted for raising the minimum wage, banning fracking, funding schools, taxing millionaires and billionaires, legalizing marijuana, reducing prison sentences, providing paid sick leave, and imposing background checks on gun purchases.

Want smaller government? I think we’ve found a worthy replacement. Let people govern themselves. They do a fine, fine job of it.

Imagine if candidates or a political party pushed for restoring a decent value to the minimum wage, banning fracking, and the whole rest of that agenda. I bet some people would vote for such candidates. And I mean even with the gerrymandering, the suppression and intimidation, the unverifiable voting machines, the disgusting negative advertising, the even more disgusting media coverage, and the legalized bribery system in all its glory, you would still see more people turn out to vote and to vote for progressive candidates — if there were progressive candidates on the ballot and in the media in the same way that the current crop of Democrats and Republicans are.

But the candidates would have to be believable. People would have to get the sense that there were things the candidates cared about and would work their hardest for, that they couldn’t be bought off with dollars or favors or rewards from a party leadership.  The fact is that busy overworked and under-informed voters and potential voters primarily want to reject the current broken system.  With nobody proposing to make the system better, those proposing to make it even worse attract support away from those proposing to muddle along more or less in the same dreary mess with a grumbled complaint or two. And, yes, every single candidate looked unworthy of voting for to the majority of potential voters. They stayed home.

Early indications are that neither the new Republican Congress nor the Democratic minority (nor President Obama) will be pushing for national legislation on the model of what voters just passed in ballot initiatives.

On the contrary, the Republican Congress expects to find a willing partner in President Obama for a conservative agenda that only a minority of Americans support. The White House and Republicans are talking up the NAFTA-on-steroids Trans-Pacific Partnership that nobody campaigned on.

Obama apparently will delay until January a vote on the war he’s already intensifying in Iraq and Syria. His FCC is pushing for the elimination of internet neutrality. (Obama himself just spoke again in support of net neutrality, but whether actions follow words is always a big question.) The new Congress will be pushing for the tar sands pipeline that Obama has for years refused to stop.

Obama’s surveillance state will have a willing partner, as will his agenda of burying information on the crimes of his predecessor.

And if you expect Congressional Democrats to push back strongly in support of middle class and working class Americans, you see something in them that many voters don’t.

After the last midterms, the Occupy movement and related resistance movements began germinating. What sort of independent popular pressure will be brought to bear now? One place to start is by saying no to Republibama government.

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  • ClubToTheHead

    I have to laugh about Obama coming out in favor of net neutrality now that he has lost the majority and Democrats can blame the Republicans for not doing what they didn’t dare do when they had the power to do it. Both parties win favor with the 1% while inspiring minutes of divisive hate in both sides of the party fan-base against each other.

    A perfect recipe for nothing of substance to happen.

    This is like Lincoln declaring slaves free (under the Emancipation Proclamation) where he had no power to free them (in the South) and keeping slavery intact where he did have power (in the North) to free them.