Favorite Washington’s Blog Guest Writers

Who are your favorite guest posters at Washington’s Blog?

Whose posts do you skip?

What other writers would you like to start seeing at Washington’s Blog?

We’re always trying to make the site interesting for you, our honored reader … so let us know what you think!

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  • wunsacon

    >> Whose posts do you skip?

    FWIW, I don’t skip any… High-quality content all-around IMO.

  • Carl_Herman

    First: GW is among the very best to explain and document central issues crucial to our successful future. That said:

    David Swanson is brilliant in his sharp and factually accurate work to recognize the illegality of US wars.

    Kevin Ryan’s guest piece is powerful to contrast what Americans receive from what informed citizens immediately reject as criminally-damning testimony from “leadership” (when citizens are actually informed).

    Ellen Brown’s work is the best on the planet to explain public banking options to transfer that power to maximize public benefits.

    I can’t think of an unhelpful guest writer (and having no idea to the extent my own work meets the needs of the public at this time).

    My own observations on the power of this and like-minded alternative media: we need to:
    1. inform the public of key issues corporate media never will,
    2. invite the public to consider the meaning of our condition, and
    3. invite the public to consider their best policy response (what to do about this).

    While I feel we’re close to the public reaching a critical mass recognition and breakthrough for all of us to have the future we all work for, the history teacher in me is not so optimistic. Consider Rene Descartes’ observation. So are we close, or are we following the path of history of momentary victories at best?

    “But now, after having once and for all put to the test the judgments of men, I here again approach these same questions regarding God and the human mind, and at the same time treat the beginnings of the whole of first philosophy, but in such a way that I have no expectation of approval from the vulgar and no wide audience of readers. Rather, I am an author to none who read these things but those who seriously meditate with me, who have the ability and the desire to withdraw their mind from the senses and at the same time from all prejudices. Such people I know all too well to be few and far between. As to those who do not take care to comprehend the order and series of my reasons but eagerly dispute over single conclusions by themselves, as is the custom for many-those, I say, will derive little benefit from a reading of this treatise; and although perhaps they might find an occasion for quibbling in many spots, still it is not an easy matter for them to raise an objection that is either compelling or worthy of response.”

    – Rene Descartes, Meditations on First Philosophy, 1641, “Preface to the Reader.” Descartes is considered the founder of modern philosophy, the founder of analytical geometry (which led to calculus), and a founder of the Scientific Revolution. Descartes was well-known in his age, but highly controversial. His work was condemned by the Roman Catholic Church in 1633, and his books put on the Index of Prohibited Books in 1663. The University of Utrecht condemned his work in 1643, where he had previously taught.

  • Geoff

    Personally,I have found this site to be one of the most informative sites available with a plethora of links to substantiate both the views and claims. The recent, shall we say…”continuing education” piece on the Bill of Rights was much needed. One could hope it would be added as an addendum to the current High School history books. I’ll bet that would wake up the sleepy saga called American History!

    Future school newspaper headline: History class-Full Attendance?

  • Geoff

    Personally,I have found this site to be one of the most informative sites available with a plethora of links to substantiate both the views and claims. The recent, shall we say…”continuing education” piece on the Bill of Rights was much needed. One could hope it would be added as an addendum to the current High School history books. I’ll bet that would wake up the sleepy saga called American History!

    Future school newspaper headline: History class-Full Attendance?

  • hyperbola

    Michael Hudson: http://michael-hudson.com/

    I enjoy your content, BUT, I prefer NOT to send any comments to sites which use US-based companies like Google, Facebook, Disqus or Twitter that are regularly spied upon by “our” government.

  • Jon

    I skip everything by Carl Herman. Dude is loony and brings this site down. Seriously, if I want to hear about how the moon is really a hollow spaceship, I can go to InfoWars or some crackpot site for that. Everyone else is at least decent.

    • Tonto

      You’re taking a cheap shot at Carl. He’s never once proclaimed the moon to be a hollow spaceship. And he is -relatively speaking- prolific here.

      Carl wants to end world poverty. He wants to do this with such a humanitarian thirst, it often leaves him proclaiming that he -can- end world poverty. You do not have to believe him to admire his tenacity, and his personal positive moral bent. Hunger sucks. So does over-population suck too, though.

      Still, I admire Carl’s persistence, and his willingness to get into the trenches with those of us who would never bother to open such a blog site, but have comments about their general effectiveness and the blind spots of the alternative media. Also, Carl’s work can be admired because he’s not about to jump on -all- the populist bandwagons that so many barely-post-adolescent neophytes cling to as a demonstration of their personal intellectual achievement. For all those altruist types, there is a long road ahead to catch up to Carl and like-minded socialist-leaning humanitarians that come with an eastern education.

      No one knows the truth. Not even Rene Descartes knew the truth. And he knew it. There are an infinite number of mathematics that can be conjured out of the minds of men, and not one of them relates directly to our reality. Yes, mathematics can be imperfectly related to our reality. But so can Chess, black magic and all other manner of human superstition. These are all blindfolds, for those who seek the truth.

      Now, while it is true, no one knows the truth, each of us can -sometimes- rule out what is not true. And, beyond methodology, knowing we each can sometimes rule out what is untrue is the important criteria to thinking logically in our wild attempts at such a godly aspiration. That’s reason enough to read GW Blog, critically. These people all try.

      Don’t skip Carl’s posts because he doesn’t always sing a song you can follow credulously. Read his posts and the comments to his posts too. The blend is as close as we’ll get to feeling our way through this darkened menagerie that is our infinitely complex reality.

      A purely detached view of the articles here, leads one to no other conclusion that this is a propagandist site. But everything is propaganda that is written. One needs to spend much more time reading books than blogs, to overcome the ubiquitous handicap of today’s online memes.

  • Will

    Ellen Brown and David Swanson are great. No comment on any others.

  • Claudiu

    Hi and thank you for all your work. For me, it would be useful to see a bit more varied content. Sometimes there are multiple consecutive posts on the same topic, and sometimes you’ve made the point long ago (for instance regarding the NSA). I tend to skip these repeats.
    I would really love to see David Malone of Golem IV write here.
    Thanks again,
    Claudiu

  • Scott Neagle

    I’d love to see Kevin Gosztola do some writing here… Washington’s Blog and The Dissenter are the only political blogs that I read daily.

  • Anonymous

    Enjoy your site GW and appreciate the information you provide to others – keep it coming! I appreciate that you do not shy from contrasting the corruption in our world and what the Bible tells us. Moral bankruptcy is, in my view, so clearly evident in our society today. I don’t ever read Carl Herman as I don’t find him credible. Don’t know what happened to Jim Quinn, I always liked him. I wonder why I don’t hear more about TPP – it seems to me that this may be the final blow. I can’t imagine the energy it takes to keep a site going for so long – I want you to know you make a different and further encourage you to continue your efforts. Peace and blessings to you.

  • Scott Neagle

    Also, I love the posts by David Swanson and share them widely.

  • ShankyS

    Read ’em all and luv ’em all. thanks for all that everyone does here. Much appreciated.

  • jo6pac

    Well I like Carl and everyone he named and the names that others have included in their comments. The site always is informative. Please leave the way to comment alone it one of few that works for me.

  • Nick

    I have no problem with any of the guest writers. I have found something to like in all of them, particularly JimQ and his outlook on American society. We need these very unique voices to have a platform from which to speak (or write in this case) if we are to develop a detailed picture of the United States and the world. The more details we have in place, and the more people we make aware of the details, the greater the good we can do for the world, however you want to define good.